Can adults begin to grow their loss tooth again? Sharks do.


 Can adults begin to grow their loss tooth again? Sharks do.

For over 450 million years ago since the evolutionary history of sharks, they have been able to retain their tooth-making genes which are likely responsible for the development of all vertebrate teeth, including humans, sharks and mammals.
§  Sharks are renowned for hunting prey because of their rows of backward pointing, razor-sharp teeth that can be regenerated quickly, and also replaced before decay
§  But whilst sharks have been able to retain these tooth-making genes that helps regenerate lost tooth, humans appear to have lost their ability to retain their tooth-making genes out over time.
But in a new study, researchers believe that their finding on the ability of sharks to regenerate their teeth provides a possibility of developing new treatments for human tooth loss in humans.
                              
The researchers identified expression patterns from several genes that led to the formation of the dental lamina – a set of epithelial cells – in the cat sharks.

What you should know about Sharks and human teeth

§  Sharks can have up to 3,000 teeth at any one time, spread over multiple rows.
§  Human teeth are embedded in the jaw whilst the teeth of sharks are embedded in the gums.
§  Sharks lose at least 30,000 teeth within their life time and have the ability to regrow their teeth within days or months.
§  A network of genes is responsible for tooth development and the regenerating ability in sharks.
§  The dental lamina is responsible for tooth development and continuous tooth regeneration in the sharks.
§  Humans possess the same network of genes responsible for tooth regeneration in sharks.
§  Once the teeth of an adult are completely formed, the dental lamina is lost.                                                                                                                
the cells are responsible for the growth of baby and adult teeth.                                                     
The researchers say because humans possess the same network of genes as that of the sharks, chances are likely that the discovery could help develop new treatments for human tooth loss. This genes are likely responsible for all vertebrate teeth
Findings were based on analysis of cat shark embryos and the assessment of the gene expression in the early formation of shark teeth.
Study published in the journal Developmental Biology andled by Dr. Gareth Fraser,
University of Sheffield,
Department of Animal and Plant Sciences,UK.
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